Baking · Breakfast & Brunch · Gluten Free · Non-vegan · Snacks · Vegetarian

Homemade Gluten-Free Granola

granola_1_contrast2_wm
The granola is good. The Photoshop, not so much (^v^)!

I know people have a phobia about making granola. It’s weird, but I can understand it. It does seem daunting, like baking chocolate chip cookies or making a tender pot roast. You want it to be perfect, to look and taste just like they do on the recipe blogs. But, unlike cookies which you can burn or pot roast that you can overcook, you cannot go wrong with making your own granola. Even if you add to much honey or forget to add cinnamon, it’ll still be perfect because you can tinker the hell out of it. There is no such thing as a bad bowl of granola. The best granola I’ve ever had was a batch I made; a sweet potato pie granola with little bits of chocolate chips in it. BAYYYYYYBEEEEEE! When I say that I was in fat girl heaven over this stuff, I practically grew angel wings :). I’ll have to make that again one of these days, but for now, your girl doesn’t need all of that temptation.

What I also don’t need is to spend nine dollars on a bag of granola.

This recipe is good for non-strict vegans and of course for my gluten-free folks. You can replace the honey for maple syrup, and for you strict vegans who don’t eat either, you can use rice syrup. I use 100% Non-GMO, gluten-free rolled oats. If you don’t have dietary issues, you can use any rolled oats you like. Rolled oats work best for granola recipes. They’re heartier and, depending on the brand, are cut and made the traditional way which means that no machinery (where cross contamination is common) is involved in processing. Store the granola in a good airtight container, and it should last you a good three months.

Ingredients

1 c. shredded coconut

1/3 c. honey

4 c. rolled gluten-free oats

½ c. walnuts, halved or chopped

2 ts. ground cinnamon

½ c. 100% raw coconut oil

½ c. almonds

1/4 ts. fine sea salt

1 ts. vanilla extract

1 c. dried fruit, optional

A 9×9 rectangular baking pan

 

Directions

Preheat oven to 300° F.

Line a pan with parchment paper or grease using non-stick cooking spray.

In a large bowl, combine oats, nuts*, coconut and salt.

Stir in the oil, vanilla and honey.

Pour and spread mixture into pan.

Stirring every six minutes, bake 25-30 minutes until golden brown.

Set aside to cool. Once cooled, granola will become crunchy. Once cooled, stir in dried fruit.

*For crunchier nuts, add after baking

© 2017 • CoffeeCupcakesKafka

Baking · Gluten Free · Non-vegan · Non-vegetarian · Pies & Cakes

Gluten Free Peach Pie

GFPeachPie2_wm
Messy-looking, but good. Much like myself! 😀

 

Thinking about old food service jobs.

I have worked around my share of stressed out bakers. They smoke a lot, drink a ton, and are terrible at fidelity. They also make great fucking pie. They put chocolate on everything, sugar, salt, and bacon in everything. You’ll be sweating butter by the time you’re done eating. Crazy fucking delicious. Want to see a show? Watch a stressed out baker make a pie. Screw up the crust, make the filling too watery, or let the meringue set for too long, and stuff like that will send a baker from 0 to 100 in two seconds. I once watched a pastry chef and a line cook almost go to blows over a brownie recipe.  I’m still dreaming of the fruit tarts from a now long defunct eatery in the MPD (Meatpacking District for you non-NYC folk). They made the best baked goods. The owner and head pastry chef had long left and the place was a dysfunctional mess. In the last months the place was opened, they had one pastry chef apprentice who had to make everything, for both the kitchen and the retail bakery next door. It was a hot mess. I didn’t envy her job. She would come into work all nice and fresh faced, and then she would emerge from the basement hours later all sweaty and flushed like she’d just done two rounds with Holly HolmJ. I sure do miss the food, not so much the life (or the people!).

I felt nostalgic for those tarts, but on a lazy Sunday, I decided to make a pie instead. I had a ton of frozen and canned peaches in the kitchen, the result of a failed plan to make my own ice cream this summer. At some point, I realized that I’ve never had peach pie. It never appealed to me, and I’m saying this as someone who’s eaten some goofy-ass pies. Goat cheese-sea salt-caramel, blue cheese-pear-ginger, bacon-fig- chocolate, fig-balsamic-rosemary. These are pretty safe, though, I once had an oyster and beer pot pie that was a vile as you’d imagine it would be. Me? I like stuff as simple as they can get.

I didn’t do much with this pie. No crumble toppings, no silly sea-salt caramel drizzles, no cinnamon-sugar crusts. Basically, no bullshit. Peach pie is pretty good, but it has nada over blueberry pie. I don’t like my pies too sweet, which is why this recipe has very little sugar, but you can had more if you like. You can also use frozen peaches for this recipe, but make sure that they’re fully thawed first.

Gluten Free Peach Pie

Ingredients

Gluten-Free Pie Crust

½ c. brown rice flour*

½ c. spelt flour*

2 T. potato starch

¼ t. xantham gum

½ t. fine sea salt

1 stick cold unsalted butter, cut into pieces

5-7 T. ice water

*You may substitute your own gluten free flour mix for this recipe.

Peach Filling

2-15 oz. cans sliced peaches in natural juice (if you use peaches in heavy syrup, make sure to rinse them off first)

¼ t. ground nutmeg

½ t. ground cinnamon

1/8 t. ground allspice

6 T. cornstarch

3 T. lemon juice

½ c. dark brown sugar

A 9-inch pie pan

Directions

For the crust: In a large bowl, add flour, salt, and cold butter. Using a pastry cutter, cut butter into the flour until pieces are pea-sized.

Mix ice water, one tablespoon at a time, into flour mixture.

Using your hands knead water into the flour mixture until the dough is soft and is held together, not crumbly or sticky (For crumbly dough, add more water, for sticky dough, add flour one tablespoon at a time.).

Turn the dough onto a floured surface. Cut in half. Roll each piece into a smooth ball.

Wrap dough balls with waxed paper and refrigerate for thirty (30) minutes up to one (1) hour.

Remove dough ball from the fridge and let sit on the counter for ten minutes before rolling.

On a floured surface and using a rolling pin, roll the dough from the center and then outwards, about twice the width of the pie pan. Do not press down on the dough, but, roll the dough firmly and lightly.

Coat pan with butter or non-stick spray and a light coat of flour. Gently place one piece of dough into the pan, working the dough into the corners. Do the same with the second piece of dough until the pan is completely covered.

Place dough in the refrigerator for 25-30 minutes.

For filling: In a medium bowl, add peaches, spices, sugar. Combine all until well mix. Stir in cornstarch. Set aside.

After chilling the pie dough, remove it from the refrigerator. Drain liquid from the pie filling (You can set the filling aside and use it as a topping).

Fill the pie with filling, arranging the peaches so that every corner is covered.

Bake 400°F for 40-45 minutes until the crust is a golden brown.

Let cool before serving.

© 2017 • CoffeeCupcakesKafka

 

Baking · Cupcakes&Muffins · Gluten Free · Non-vegan · Non-vegetarian

Gluten Free Blueberry Muffins

BlueberrySpeltMuffins_wm.jpg

Because of my weird food allergies, I’ve had to be picky about so many things. But, I’m not picky about fruit, especially if it’s frozen. The best banana bread I’ve ever made was using some frozen sliced bananas I’d left in my freezer for three months and forgotten about. All of the moisture retained in the bananas, I didn’t even need butter, which was nice because I was stone cold broke when I made it. The best food I’ve ever had was when I didn’t have much money or many ingredients in the pantry. It’s a lot tougher when you have food allergies and you’re broke, especially gluten and where-related allergies because catering to your diet can really run through your wallet.

Bless the Dollar Tree. I freaking love the Dollar Tree. I could write an opus about how awesome that place is. You kind of have to put your ethics aside to shop there because you know that what you’re getting is definitely probably not good for the environment and maybe in the long run eating those frozen meatballs and those mouse pad-shaped disks of tilapia are definitely probably not good for your health! Still, if you live in a city or are facing tough economic times, you can get a nice selection of food, and if you’re a good cook, you can really make great meals from what you find there. I go there to get bags of frozen fruit for a buck and it lasts a while. The last time I was there, I went overboard and purchased a half dozen bags of blueberries because I use blueberries in everything. I make my own preserves, use them in smoothies, and put them on my cold and hot cereal. A fresh pint of blueberries, at least in my neighborhood anyway, is about three dollars. And they’re not even organic. The audacity! Even worse, they’re often not even filled to capacity. City living, I tell you! Crooks everywhere! Whenever I buy fresh berries from the supermarket, I take them out of the carton, put them into a plastic produce bag or in my produce bag I bring from home, and then weigh them on the scale. At the Dollar Tree, you get a twelve ounce bag, whereas most fresh cartons are less than ten ounces. No ma’am. I like to get the best out of my damn dollar.

This morning, I wanted some sort of bread with my breakfast. Since I’m allergic to wheat and was out of my own homemade gluten free bread, I figured I’d make muffins. They came out pretty good! It doesn’t really make that much of a difference if you use frozen versus fresh berries, except for the appearance, because frozen blueberries have the tendency to pop in the oven more than fresh berries, I’ve found. Maybe it’s something to do with the amount of added water from freezing. Still, in terms of taste and flavor, frozen berries do the trick. I usually like to make a crumble topping, but I was at the market this weekend and the price of butter had me shook! Between inflation and droughts, man. I spend more on butter than I do anything else, and I eat organic butter, grass-fed. Organic butter may as well be mixed with pure gold, it’s so expensive. If you don’t have butter, you can switch the butter with mashed bananas (or oil), one (1) cup. Honestly, I wish I’d made these with bananas instead of butter, but however you make your muffins, they’ll come out great.

Gluten Free Blueberry Muffins

Ingredients

1 c. spelt flour

½ c. coconut flour

½ c. brown rice flour

1 T. baking powder

½ t. fine sea salt

1 stick butter, softened at room temperature

¼ t. xantham gum

2/3 c. granulated sugar

2/3 c. light brown sugar

1 t.  vanilla extract

3 small eggs

½ c.  whole milk

2 ¼ c. frozen blueberries

Directions

Preheat oven to 375°F.

In a medium bowl, cream butter and sugars until slightly fluffy and then set aside.

Next, add in eggs and vanilla until well mixed.

In a separate bowl, combine baking powder, salt, flour until well mixed. Next, add it to the wet mixture.

Add whole milk into the mixture and combine until you have a smooth batter.

Fold berries into the batter.

Line a muffin pan with muffin paper and fill each three-quarters of the way with batter.

Bake for about 38-40 minutes or until a slightly golden brown.

Remove from oven, let cool, about an hour before serving, two hours or more before freezing.

© 2017 • CoffeeCupcakesKafka